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Sharing crafts/passing on skills.

Hand – knitting Group

Hand knitting was first introduced to Ireland in the 17th century. That said, it appears that some form of similar craftsmanship was present in Ireland over a thousand years ago. In any event, knitting skills became a part of everyday life. All along the western seaboard, handknitting, weaving and other home crafts were encouraged in the latter half of the 19th century as a way to generate income in poor rural communities. On the Aran Islands, however, according to an 1893 report, nothing woven or spun was being sold. The only items knitted by the women were socks for their own families.

Knitting was a communal activity, a pastime that brought together the young girls and women of the islands who shared their knowledge and skills and passed them from one generation to the next. Patterns were never written down and any new discovery spread like wildfire in the community. It was said that at Sunday mass, the women were more interested in staring at the stitches of knitted stockings with their patterned tops than they were in saying there prayers. The idea was to try and duplicate a new stitch or pattern. When the leap was made from knitting stockings with patterned tops to larger garments with decoration, the Aran sweater was born.

The knitting and crochet group in the Bray Family resource centres are facilitated by women who have a great personal knowledge of the craft and share it with other women who came into the group.

The knitting activity is social and combats isolation as well as giving people the skills required to produce items for friends and family. The knitters encourage each other with different skill levels and show each other how to do the different patterns and produce different pieces of work. The group forms a bond of friendship and trust and through personal stories, and that enables the production of many lovely crafted pieces. In times of recessions, people return to old crafts as a way to save money and perhaps also produce pieces for others to make a small income.

 Porcelain Painting Group

Porcelain/china painting

Ceramic painting has been in existence in Ireland for some time. The ceramic designer Frederick Vodrey (1845-97) had a small pottery behind his warehouse in Moore Street, Dublin and in 1880 opened a retail outlet in Mary Street. The shop is described in the industries of Dublin. The area of Henry Street and Mary Street in Dublin city was a busy shopping place, where retailers sold a wide range of goods for home decoration, such as wallpapers, furniture and ceramics.

The groups in the Bray Resource centres learn and share the tradition with each other through the expert craft worker, Maeve. She leads the group, sharing her skills and encouraging the participants to express themselves artistically through their work after choosing their designs, they prepare the pieces and then the pieces are fired. The group learn the skills through being shown but also through the personal stories of each other which contribute to the groups work. It is this sense of shared like experiences that help to inform their work. A great sense of personal satisfaction can be achieved from this craft and the women/men not only learn a skill but also benefit from a sense of pride in their work and sense of friendship and community working together.

 

Sharing crafts/passing on skills.

Hand – knitting Group

Hand knitting was first introduced to Ireland in the 17th century. That said, it appears that some form of similar craftsmanship was present in Ireland over a thousand years ago. In any event, knitting skills became a part of everyday life. All along the western seaboard, handknitting, weaving and other home crafts were encouraged in the latter half of the 19th century as a way to generate income in poor rural communities. On the Aran Islands, however, according to an 1893 report, nothing woven or spun was being sold. The only items knitted by the women were socks for their own families.

Knitting was a communal activity, a pastime that brought together the young girls and women of the islands who shared their knowledge and skills and passed them from one generation to the next. Patterns were never written down and any new discovery spread like wildfire in the community. It was said that at Sunday mass, the women were more interested in staring at the stitches of knitted stockings with their patterned tops than they were in saying there prayers. The idea was to try and duplicate a new stitch or pattern. When the leap was made from knitting stockings with patterned tops to larger garments with decoration, the Aran sweater was born.

The knitting and crochet group in the Bray Family resource centres are facilitated by women who have a great personal knowledge of the craft and share it with other women who came into the group.

The knitting activity is social and combats isolation as well as giving people the skills required to produce items for friends and family. The knitters encourage each other with different skill levels and show each other how to do the different patterns and produce different pieces of work. The group forms a bond of friendship and trust and through personal stories, and that enables the production of many lovely crafted pieces. In times of recessions, people return to old crafts as a way to save money and perhaps also produce pieces for others to make a small income.

 Porcelain Painting Group

Porcelain/china painting

Ceramic painting has been in existence in Ireland for some time. The ceramic designer Frederick Vodrey (1845-97) had a small pottery behind his warehouse in Moore Street, Dublin and in 1880 opened a retail outlet in Mary Street. The shop is described in the industries of Dublin. The area of Henry Street and Mary Street in Dublin city was a busy shopping place, where retailers sold a wide range of goods for home decoration, such as wallpapers, furniture and ceramics.

The groups in the Bray Resource centres learn and share the tradition with each other through the expert craft worker, Maeve. She leads the group, sharing her skills and encouraging the participants to express themselves artistically through their work after choosing their designs, they prepare the pieces and then the pieces are fired. The group learn the skills through being shown but also through the personal stories of each other which contribute to the groups work. It is this sense of shared like experiences that help to inform their work. A great sense of personal satisfaction can be achieved from this craft and the women/men not only learn a skill but also benefit from a sense of pride in their work and sense of friendship and community working together.

 


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